Posts Tagged ‘Norma’

A Jellyfish on the Move

NASA/ESA Hubble/CXC

A jellyfish, blue tendrils trailing, speeds across this Hubble image of galaxy ESO 137-001. What shapes or stories do you see? Leave a note below.

heic1404b_screenIntense blue streaks trail ESO 137-001 in this composite image from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. Wisps of gas stream from hot blue stars as the spiral galaxy ESO 137-001 blasts through the heart of galaxy cluster Abell 3627. Astronomers call this stripping of gas and dust from a galaxy ram pressure stripping. Ram pressure is the drag felt by an object as it moves through a thick fluid, such as your body walking through water. The fluid here though would not be suitable for swimming. It’s superheated gas that lurks near the heart of all galaxy clusters.

Surrounding this galaxy are countless nearby stars in our own Milky Way Galaxy. ESO 137-001 lies near the plane of our galaxy, its light blocked by thick dust and gas. Farther away in the image, look for galaxies of all shapes and pointing in different directions. Most of those galaxies are far beyond ESO 137-001 and are not part of the Abell 3627 galaxy cluster. ESO-137-001 lies about 200 million light-years from Earth. It is part of the Norma Cluster near the center of a region of space called the Great Attractor. This area’s mass is so strong that even The Local Group, containing our galaxy and the Andromeda Galaxy, feel the tug of this strong gravity source.

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Supernova Lobster

Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/T.Temim et al. and ESA/XMM-Newton Radio: SIFA/MOST and CSIRO/ATNF/ATCA; Infrared: UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF/2MASS

A pulsar throbs in the middle of this unusual nebula created by a supernova explosion.

Zoom in and explore the inside of G327.1-1.1 in this image from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. What shapes do you make out in this nebula? A fish? A trilobite? Let us know what you see by leaving a comment below.

G327 is all that’s left after a massive star exploded in the Milky Way Galaxy. Astronomers call this structure a pulsar wind nebula. The pulsar likely is the bluish blob at the heart of the nebula. After a supernova explosion, the core of the star is all that remains. This dense and highly magnetic neutron star spins thousands of times per minute and is called a pulsar. As viewed from Earth, these stars pulse with radio energy at regular rates. The rate is so steady, that astronomers know pulsars by the frequency of their pulses and they use them as yardsticks to measure distances.

The image is a combination of images with X-ray images represented by the colors blue, radio information showing as red and yellow and infrared data from the 2MASS survey showing the stars in the field of view. Explore the reddish outline showing the leading edge of the blast. Astronomers are not certain why the nebula is off-center from the pulsar nor the comet-shaped structure streaming from the pulsar itself. One possibility is that a shockwave bounced back from the material at the edge of the nebula. Scientists call this a reverse shock and it could have pushed the wind nebula down and away from the star.

G327.1-1.1 is found about 29,000 light-years from Earth toward the constellation Norma.

Anthill

Image Credit: NASA, ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
Acknowledgment: R. Sahai (Jet Propulsion Lab) and B. Balick (University of Washington)

The Hubble Space Telescope shows us another example of how our Sun might die in 5 billion years. The “Ant Nebula, ” or Menzel 3, shows two glowing bubbles coming out from the dying star. Astronomers are most curious about the equal shape of the bubble on either side of the star. This symmetry offers scientists a chance to come up with many different ideas on the cause.

These images of planetary nebula show astronomers that the Sun’s fate will be much more interesting, colorful and complex than they thought just a few years ago.

The Hubble Space Telescope took this image in 1997 and 1998. The Ant Nebula is located in a small constellation called Norma, the Southern Triangle, near the constellation Scorpius, the scorpion. Light traveled 3,000 years from the “Ant Nebula” to reach our eyes on Earth.

Do you see any other patterns in this image? Does this ant have legs? What might have caused them?

Anthill

Image Credit: NASA, ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
Acknowledgment: R. Sahai (Jet Propulsion Lab) and B. Balick (University of Washington)

The Hubble Space Telescope shows us another example of how our Sun might die in 5 billion years. The “Ant Nebula, ” or Menzel 3, shows two glowing bubbles coming out from the dying star. Astronomers are most curious about the equal shape of the bubble on either side of the star. This symmetry offers scientists a chance to come up with many different ideas on the cause.

These images of planetary nebula show astronomers that the Sun’s fate will be much more interesting, colorful and complex than they thought just a few years ago.

The Hubble Space Telescope took this image in 1997 and 1998. The Ant Nebula is located in a small constellation called Norma, the Southern Triangle, near the constellation Scorpius, the scorpion. Light traveled 3,000 years from the “Ant Nebula” to reach our eyes on Earth.

Do you see any other patterns in this image? Does this ant have legs? What might have caused them?

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The ancient peoples saw pictures in the sky. From those patterns in the heavens, ancient storytellers created legends about heroes, maidens, dragons, bears, centaurs, dogs and mythical creatures...
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